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Antique Rifles and Long Guns

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**CASED**C1853 Victorian, John Pratt Edinburgh Scotland 16 Bore Double Barrelled, Muzzle Loading, Percussion Sporting Shotgun. Sn 21572:3 - 21572:3
John Pratt was a Scottish Edinburgh based gunmaker at various Edinburgh addresses from 1814 to 1861. In 1853 he was recorded at 99 Princes Street, Edinburgh (see page 311 of British Gunmakers Vol.2 By Brown). This is a very good Victorian double barrel percussion sporting shotgun by John Pratt Edinburgh made C1853 when he was recorded as working at his Princes Street premises. It has 28” steel barrels set side by side. The barrels have a central flat top barrel rib & bead fore sight. The rib is signed ‘J.Pratt 99 Princes Street, Edinburgh’. The barrel’s smooth bores have staining and residue consistent with age & use. The underside of the barrels have proofs and are each marked ‘JP’ (John Pratt). It has its original walnut stock with chequered grip panels and inlaid void white metal escutcheon. The action has tooled decoration and both action plates are signed by the maker ‘Pratt’. The shotgun has a wood ramrod. The weapon cocks & dry fires as it should. The weapon is contained in its later good quality sturdy fitted leather covered wood carry case with hinged lid, carry handle, clasp fasteners and lock (key absent). The case has leather retaining straps with brass buckles. Internally the case is fitted with compartments for the shotgun and accessories. The case is lined with felt. The price includes UK delivery. NB. As an antique percussion shotgun no licence is required to own this weapon in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. Sn 21572:3
£675.00

**QUALITY MAKER**Victorian 1880 Westley Richards Whitworth Patent Percussion Capping Breech Loading 'Monkey Tail' .450 / .483 Calibre Carbine. A 1101 - A 1101
British Military Trials on Breech Loading rifles began in the mid 1800's. The most successful rifle was that submitted by Westley Richards. Its breech consisted of a plunger attached to a long handle which, when the breech was closed, lay along the top of the stock neck and was raised to open it, thus earning The nickname of the monkey-tail from its distinctive silhouette. This is a quality made, Westley Richards Percussion Capping Breech Loading 'Monkey Tail' carbine. It has a 23 ½” blued barrel & measures 41” overall. The rifle’s bore has just staining consistent with age and well defined deep rifling. The barrel is crisply marked ‘Whitworth Patent’. The barrel is numbered ‘C2696, has proofs and .450 & .483 calibre detail. The steel butt plate has a hinged trap. It has a block and blade fore-sight and graduated flip up ladder rear sight. It has original undamaged walnut stock and is fitted with sling swivels. The steel trigger guard tang is numbered 25439. Its lift-up trapdoor action 'Monkey Tail' breech functions as it should and has Westley Richards maker detail which is repeated on the action plate. The action is dated ‘1880’. The rifle has its original iron clearing rod. The rifle’s loading & firing actions work crisply. The price for this Westley Richards 'Monkey Tail' carbine includes UK delivery. NB As an obsolete calibre antique percussion weapon no licence is required to own this item in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. A 1101
£1,375.00

**RARE**American Civil War 1863 Union Contract British 1863 Dated Enfield Tower Pattern 1853 .577 Calibre (US .58 Calibre) 3 Band Muzzle Loading Rifle Musket With Union Army Acceptance Mark, British WD Pattern 1853 Socket Bayonet & Scabbard. A 1100 - A 1100
During the American Civil War both the Union & Confederate forces imported large quantities of European firearms to assist them in arming their troops. The most widely used was the British Pattern 1853 Enfield rifle-musket because it was accurate and well made. An important factor for both sides was that the .58 calibre bullet used by both Union and Confederate forces was interchangeable with the .577 Enfield. Many Enfield rifle-muskets were successfully smuggled into the South by the Confederacy during the war. The Enfield 1853 rifle-muskets saw service in every major engagement from the Battle of Shiloh (April 1862) and the Siege of Vicksburg (May 1863), to the final battles of 1865. An original period black & white photograph of Confederate dead after the Second Battle of Fredericksburg on May 3, 1863 is illustrated in image 1. A number of Enfield Pattern 1853 rifled muskets are visible in the image. This is an excellent original British Pattern 1853 Infantry rifle musket one of those ordered by the American Union Government in 1863 for use in the American Civil war. It has a 39” barrel and measures 55” overall. The barrel’s bore has well defined rifling and just staining & residue consistent with age and use. It has its original undamaged walnut stock and regulation brass fittings. It has a heavy military hammer, block & blade fore sight & adjustable ladder rear sight. The action plate is marked with Queen’s Crown VR (Victoria Regina), ‘Tower’ (Enfield) and ‘1863’ date. The barrel has a small American Union army acceptance mark and 1863 date (illustrated). The rifle has sling swivels and iron ramrod. The rifle’s cocking and firing action is crisp. The rifle is accompanied by an original period British P1853 socket bayonet. The bayonet measures 20 ½” overall length and has a clean 17” triangular blade. It has the correct swivel locking catch at the socket. The blade has a British WD inspection mark. The bayonet has its original brass mounted leather scabbard. All leather and stitching are clean and intact. The price includes UK delivery. NB As an antique percussion weapon no licence is required to own this item in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. A 1100
£1,595.00

British Martini Henry .577x 450 Calibre Cavalry Carbine IC 1 By The Braendlin Armoury Company. Sn - 21571
The Martini Henry cavalry carbine was developed to replace the Snider cavalry carbine and was issued to the troops in 1877. There were many delays in its introduction including a reduced power cartridge and lighter bullet to reduce the recoil on the lighter gun. This carbine carries all of the modifications to the carbine including rounding off the leather sight protector screws and the forend attachment. This is an original Martini Henry cavalry carbine IC 1 manufactured by the Braendlin Armoury Company to help to fill the Enfield contract for Martini Henry carbines. The carbine is stamped on the left hand side of the receiver THE BRAENDLIN ARMOURY Co and bears its crossed pennants monogram on the top of the barrels nocksform. The rear sight is graduated to 900 yards and has a fore sight protected by two sight wings. The carbine is fitted with the correct ball ended cleaning rod and fore end. The fore end under the rear sight has a rounded headed screw that originally held a leather sight protector. The barrel has a bright bore with well-defined rifling together with proof marks. The carbine carries the serial number 09671 under the action. See section D, Martini arms, RB 100 on page 19 and 20 of the Catalogue of the Enfield Pattern Room, British Rifles, published by Her Majesty’s Stationary Office and chapter 8 together pages 91 to 96 with the plate on page 94 in The Martini-Henry for Queen and Empire by Neil Aspinshaw. The price for this antique rifle includes UK delivery and no licence is required to own this item in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. Sn 21571
£1,200.00

SOLD SOLD (10/04) 1854-1861 Victorian HMMC (Her Majesties Mail Coaches) Government / WD Broad Arrow Marked 13 Bore Double Barrel Side By Side Muzzle Loading Percussion Guard’s Short 'Coaching' Shotgun By Edmund Balchin Hull. Sn 21515 - 21515
The early Royal Mail Coaches were similar to ordinary family coaches, but with Post Office livery. The first mail coach ran in 1784, operating between Bristol and London. Delivery staff received uniforms for the first time in 1793, and the Post Office Investigation Branch was established. The first mail train ran in 1830, on the Liverpool and Manchester Railway. The standard armament for a guard on these coaches and trains was a shotgun or blunderbuss & at least one pistol. Edmund Balchin was an English gunmaker recording as working from 1854-1861 at 72 Mytongate, Hull (se page 75 of English Gunmakers by Baily & Nie. This is an HMMC mail coach or train guard’s shotgun by Balchin Hull. It has short 20 ¼” browned steel barrels and measures 36 ¾” overall. The barrels set side by side have smooth bores which have just light staining and residue consistent with age & use. It has its original walnut stock with chequered panels at the wrist & fore stock. The stock is crisply impressed ‘HMMC’ (Her Majesties Mail Coaches) above Government / WD Broad Arrow Marked and the steel action plates are signed by the maker ‘E. Balchin Hull’. It has steel butt plate & heavy military hammers, double triggers & steel trigger guard with extended tang & ebonised wood ram rod with brass end cap. The weapon cocks & dry fires crisply. The price for this antique mail coaching shotgun includes UK delivery. Sn 21515
£0.00

1871 Dated, Enfield Pattern 1853, 3 Band .577 Percussion Calibre, Second Pattern Snider Rifle by BSA Co. Sn - 21570
This is an Enfield Pattern 1853, 3 Band percussion Snider rifle manufactured by BSA Company in 1871. The lock plate is stamped With Queens Crown VR (Victoria Regina) BSA Co and 1871 (date). The rifle is complete with its 900 yard range ladder rear sight, correct Snider hammer, block and blade fore sight , sling swivels, Baddeley barrel bands and cleaning rod. The wood work is stamped with the Enfield roundel and has the usual age related knocks, bumps and bruises. The rifle is complete with its original brass butt plate, fore end block and trigger guard with the extended tang. The breach block is stamped BSA Co on the top and the breach is stamped with ** and II signifying a second pattern breech block. The 3 groove barrel has a bright bore with well-defined 3 groove rifling together with proof marks. The cocking and firing actions are crisp. The rifle measures 54” with a 39” barrel. See Section C, Snider Arms, Catalogue of the Enfield Pattern Room, British Rifles, published by Her Majesty’s Stationary Office. The price includes UK delivery. NB This is an antique obsolete calibre rifle and no licence is required to own it in the UK if retained as a part of a collection or display. Sn 21590
£1,200.00

ZULU WARS ERA, 1874 Dated British Martini Henry MK I Converted To MK II Rifle .577x .450 Obsolete Centre Fire Calibre Service Rifle & 1876 Pattern Bayonet . Sn - 21569
This is an early example of an original .577x .450 Martini Henry mark I converted to mark II standard, British service rifle. The rifle is fully ordnance stamped and has its original woodwork throughout. The rifle has a the long cocking indicator block and blade fore sight, flip up ladder rear sight, steel butt plate, sling swivels, correct MK II steel cleaning rod, grooved trigger & bayonet lug. The rifle has an infill below the axis pin which was a modification done in 1875 after the split axis pin was introduced to replace the earlier solid bronze axis pin fitted to early mark I rifles. The 33 ¼ “ steel barrel's bore is clean with crisp rifling and the rifle measures 49 ½” overall. The wood furniture has bumps and bruises to be expected with age and service use. The stock is stamped with the Enfield WD roundel with II stamped over I. The metal work has many WD ordnance inspection marks (illustrated). The action is stamped on the right side Crown VR (Victoria Regina) BSA & M Co (Birmingham Small Arms & Metals Company) 1874 (manufacture date) an inspection stamp Mark I to Mark II conversion designation where the first I is central over the inspection mark with the second I stamped to the right after the conversion of the rifle from a mark I to a mark II. The action works crisply. The rifle comes complete with its as found 1876 Pattern Martini Henry rifle socket bayonet. See section D, Martini arms, RB 93 - 96 on page 18 and 19 of the Catalogue of the Enfield Pattern Room, British Rifles, published by Her Majesty’s Stationary Office and chapters 2 to 4 together with the plate on page 49 in The Martini-Henry for Queen and Empire by Neil Aspinshaw. The price includes UK delivery. NB As an antique obsolete calibre rifle and no licence is required to own this rifle in the UK if retained as a part of a collection or display. Sn 21569
£1,475.00

**MASSIVE**19th Century North African / Moroccan/ Arabic 25 Bore Miquelet Lock Camel Musket With Decorated Brass Barrel Bands & Ram Rod. Sn 21450 - 21450
Miquelet lock is a modern term used by collectors and curators, largely in the English-speaking world, for a type of firing mechanism used in muskets and pistols. It is a distinctive form of snaplock, originally as a flint-against-steel ignition form, once prevalent in Spain, Portugal, Italy, the Balkans, North Africa, the Ottoman Empire and throughout Spain's colonies from the late 16th to the mid 19th centuries. The miquelet may have come to the attention of arms makers in Istanbul & North Africa via long-established trade routes from Italian city-states through the port of Ragusa (Dubrovnik) to provinces on the Balkan Peninsula. Other avenues were probably provided by booty from corsair raids and/or from the many Ottoman-Euro conflicts of the period. The muzzle loading weapons were generally handmade weapons, and consequently they widely varied in their construction. They usually had very long barrels. The stocks were handmade and ornately decorated, featuring a distinctive curve which is not seen in the stocks of other muskets. The function of this curve is debated; it may be purely decorative, or it may have allowed the weapon to be tucked under the arm and cradled tightly against the body, as opposed to being held to the shoulder like a typical musket or rifle. These type of guns were often carried by warriors mounted on Camels. This is a 19th century miquelet lock Camel musket. It measures 5 Feet 1 Inch overall length. It has a 47” sighted steel barrel which is 25 Bore. The bore has heavy staining and residue consistent with age & use. The barrel has hand tooled brass barrel bands. The shoulder stock has typical thick tropical hardwood butt plate. The musket has a steel ram rod. The weapon has the wear and patina to be expected of a native North African / Arabic weapon of its age. The lock plate and cock have naïve markings (illustrated in image 2). The cocking spring is strong but the lock does not cock. Delivery of this item will be by arrangement, at cost & within the UK only. NB As an antique miquelet musket no licence is required to own this item in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. Sn 21450
£475.00

SOLD SOLD (LAY-AWAY 15/03) Gurkha Model 1837 Brunswick Percussion .66” Calibre 2 Groove Rifle and Sword Bayonet. Sn - 21490
This is an original Gurkha model 1837 Brunswick percussion .66” 2 groove rifle complete with its original brass hilted sword bayonet and is part of the horde discovered in the old Palace of Lagan Silekhana in Katmandu, Nepal. This rifle and bayonet are in excellent condition with good wood and metal work, being manufactured at the state arsenal in Nepal. The gun has a steel back action lock plate with brass trigger guard, butt plate with a finger rest, fore end cap and barrel wedge plates. The musket is fitted with a 2 leaf rear sight, one of which is hinged and foresight together with its original mushroom head steel ram rod and 2 iron sling swivels. The musket measures 46 ½ inches in length with a 30 ¼ inch barrel where the 2 groove bore is clean with staining consistent with use. The trigger guard, inside the patch box and rear of the bayonet bar are engraved in Nepalese script as to the regimental issue. The musket’s cocking and firing action works crisply. The muzzle is fitted with a steel bayonet bar and is complete with its original brass hilted Nepalese model 1838 sword bayonet. The single edge blade has a short back edge and measures 67cm long with a 55cm blade. See pages 30 – 32 & 123 - 128 including the plates in Guns of the Gurkhas, (The lost arsenal: pistols, rifles and machine guns of the Royal Nepalese Army, 1816 – 1945) by John Walter. As an antique musket, no licence is required to own this item in the UK if retained as part of a collection or display. Sn 21490
£0.00

British, East India Company, Pattern A, Percussion .750 Calibre Muzzle Loading Percussion Carbine. Sn - 21531
This is a British East India Company Pattern A percussion .75” infantry percussion carbine. The carbine has a 27 ½ inch smoothbored barrel with London proof marks. The carbine has all original woodwork and fittings, a straight trigger guard, two rammer pipes, and a trigger guard sling swivel. The pattern A was made up of old flintlock parts and a nipple lump brazed to the barrel. this was modified in the pattern B where a complete new percussion breech section screwed on. The barrel is secured to the stock with pins. The lock plate is stamped with EIC’s Rampant Lion trademark and a crown over 8. The barrel has feint London proof marks and the stock is stamped to the right hand side with a feint roundel with what appears to be HA over P stamped within. The stock is also stamped near this with a 1 over T1. The left hand side of the stock is stamped with the number 58. The barrel carries the numbers 288 & 1176 stamped into it near the breech. The carbine measures 43 ½ inches in length with a 27 ½ inch barrel, the bore having just light staining consistent with age. The A pattern musket was produced in 1840 and a such has no rear or fore sights fitted. The cocking and firing actions work crisply. The stock has the usual knocks and bumps due to service use. Carbines such as this saw service and action in many Indian campaigns from 1845 including the 2nd Sikh War, and the Great Indian Mutiny it was used by both sides. Many of these muskets were returned to this country from the Nepal Royal Armoury. During the Mutiny, Nepal sent a contingent in support of the British on arrival in India they were armed with muskets such as this and upon return to Nepal together with Indian Mutineers who were disarmed and the weapons kept by the Nepal authorities for issue to its forces. This musket bears feint Nepalese regimental markings to the tang at the front of the butt plate, showing re issue to Nepalese troops. See pages 30 - 40 & 123 - 128 including the plates in Guns of the Gurkhas, (The lost arsenal: pistols, rifles and machine guns of the Royal Nepalese Army, 1816 – 1945) by John Walter. The price includes UK delivery. NB This is an antique muzzle loading percussion musket and no licence is required to own it in the UK if retained as a part of a collection or display. Sn 21531
£695.00
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