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Cased, WWII 1939 British WD Officer's Pattern MK IX Military Marching Compass by J.M. Glauser. London & WW II era Brown Leather Case By J.L.F. & Co With Shoulder Strap. MISC 911 - MISC 911
Colonel William Willoughby Cole Verner patented several marching Compass designs. Whilst the basic prismatic compass design has its origins in Schmalcalder's patent of 1812 (Patent No 3545), Verner's Pattern is a significant development. Verner's Patents were all pocket compasses. Model numbers were issued to his compasses starting with a Verner's Pattern V with developments through to the VII, VIII and the IX of WW2. Verner's Pattern compasses are both incredibly popular with collectors as well being a compass that can still be practically and easily used today. The most common models are the Verner's Pattern VII and Verner's Pattern VIII which were mainly used during WW1. Their basic construction is a prismatic dry card compass with a both a momentary bearing lock and transit lock. This is an excellent original example of the MK IX. It is fully functioning. It has a brass case and is mounted with lanyard ring. The glass face and numbered brass outer ring are perfectly intact. The rear is stamped 'J.M. Glauser London – No B6130 MK IX 1939’. It is complete with brown leather case with hinged top and buckle fastener. The case is impressed ‘A – J.L.F. & Co’. The case has its original leather shoulder strap. All leather and stitching of the case are intact. The price includes UK delivery. MISC 911.
£275.00

1912-1959-WWI/II ‘Stars and Stripes’ American Flag. MISC 910. - MISC 910
The number of stars on the American flag first grew to 48 in 1912 with the addition of New Mexico and Arizona. President William Howard Taft issued an Executive Order that year that formalized the appearance of the flag for the first time. The Order indicated that the stars were to be arranged in six horizontal rows of eight each. This flag was official for 47 years. During this time, the United States emerged from the Great Depression and World War II as one of the leading nations of the world. Eight Presidents served under the 48-star flag; William H. Taft, Woodrow Wilson, Warren Harding, Calvin Coolidge, Herbert Hoover, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S Truman, and Dwight D. Eisenhower. This example measures 58” x 28” It has stitched edges, and a white hem on one side with brass ringed holes for pole mounting. The flag has some minor age related holes (see pictures). A great piece of history worthy of further investigation. The price includes UK delivery. MISC 910.
£175.00

c1919 Vickers Machine Gun, Post WWI Steam Hose Connection and Original Hose. MISC 909. - MISC 909
The first condensing tube adapter screwed onto the water jackets , which was time consuming, and since it made a 90’ angle to the water jacket , it was easily broken off. A clip on type was also available, but although this could be affixed quickly, it did not make a tight seal so it was not adopted. The prevent the problems caused by the tubing making a right angle to the water jacket, a new pattern was introduced by ‘LoC 18424’ of January 8th 1917. This solved the problem of breakage, etc, but did not resolve the requirement of quick detachability. This problem was finally overcome on November 21st 1919, when the steam condenser fitting was engaged to the spring-loaded bayonet socket type (which required that all guns be fitted with a special boss to accommodate it). This also allowed the hose to lie parallel to the water jacket, which prevented snagging and breakage. This socket became standard on all British and Australian Vickers guns until they were withdrawn from service in 1968. See page 490-493 of ‘The grand Old Lady of No Man’s Land’ The Vickers Machine Gun by Dolf L Goldsmith. Fully intact, measuring just over 6ft in length and showing minimal signs of wear, this piece of history is worthy of any collection. The price includes UK delivery. MISC 909. (Telescopes)
£325.00

*Large* Victorian Naval Bosuns Cosh/Persuader. MISC 908. - MISC 908
This is a Bosuns’ starter, or cosh, and was used by ships’ Bosuns to hit (or start) slow or lazy sailors, making them work faster. These instruments are also sometimes ironically called ‘persuaders’. Ships’ Bosuns supervised the crew in sailing the vessel and maintaining the ropes, rigging, boats, anchors and stores on board. Clearly this was a role that required very strict discipline, hence this type of instrument commonly used to keep the crew on their toes. Later in the19th century, brutal punishments on board Royal Navy ships began to be frowned upon by society and these types of cruel instruments, along with the notorious punishment of flogging, became less common. Many Bosuns’ starters seem to have been made with great care and skill. Some are designed with a handle and rope with a weighted end, whilst others, like this one, are more rod-like. It consists of a wooden bound (likely Malacca wood) core with a weighted end made of lead and bound in twine knot work. The handle end is bound in tan leather held with brass coloured pins *one appears to be missing*. Measuring 47 cm in length and weighing 0.434g, this unusually large cosh/pacifier/starter is in very good condition for its age (see pictures) . A collectors piece which would warrant some interesting extra investigation. The price includes UK delivery. MISC 908. (Truncheons)
£275.00

Victorian Naval Bosuns Cosh/Persuader. MISC 907. - MISC 907
This is a Bosuns’ starter, or cosh, and was used by ships’ Bosuns to hit (or start) slow or lazy sailors, making them work faster. These instruments are also sometimes ironically called ‘persuaders’. Ships’ Bosuns supervised the crew in sailing the vessel and maintaining the ropes, rigging, boats, anchors and stores on board. Clearly this was a role that required very strict discipline, hence this type of instrument commonly used to keep the crew on their toes. Later in the19th century, brutal punishments on board Royal Navy ships began to be frowned upon by society and these types of cruel instruments, along with the notorious punishment of flogging, became less common. Many Bosuns’ starters seem to have been made with great care and skill. Some are designed with a handle and rope with a weighted end, whilst others, like this one, are more rod-like. It consists of a wooden bound (likely Malacca wood) core with weighted ends made of lead and bound in twine knot work *one end missing some twine* The two ends have brass coloured caps with a floral engraving. Measuring 30 cm in length and weighing 0.198g, this cosh/pacifier/starter is in good condition for its age (see pictures) . A collectors piece which would warrant some interesting extra investigation. The price includes UK delivery. MISC 907. (Truncheons)
£195.00

**RESERVED REE 21/6**Victorian Naval Bosuns Cosh/Persuader. MISC 906. - MISC 906
This is a Bosuns’ starter, or cosh, and was used by ships’ Bosuns to hit (or start) slow or lazy sailors, making them work faster. These instruments are also sometimes ironically called ‘persuaders’. Ships’ Bosuns supervised the crew in sailing the vessel and maintaining the ropes, rigging, boats, anchors and stores on board. Clearly this was a role that required very strict discipline, hence this type of instrument commonly used to keep the crew on their toes. Later in the19th century, brutal punishments on board Royal Navy ships began to be frowned upon by society and these types of cruel instruments, along with the notorious punishment of flogging, became less common. Many Bosuns’ starters seem to have been made with great care and skill. Some are designed with a handle and rope with a weighted end, whilst others, like this one, are more rod-like. It consists of a metal core with weighted ends made of lead and bound in twine knot work. The shaft is what appears to be ‘Malacca wood’ (Malacca wood is taken from one species of rattan palm native to the coast of Sumatra. With long, slender stems it was considered perfect for making walking sticks and canes. It is very lightweight and strong with a satin-like bark that has a natural gloss. The colour varies from blond through to reddish amber to brown) with original leather wrist strap. Measuring 27 cm in length and weighing 0.362g, this cosh/pacifier/starter is in very good condition for its age (see pictures) . A collectors piece which would warrant some interesting extra investigation. The price includes UK delivery. MISC 906. (Truncheons)
£195.00

WW1 campaign medals ‘Trio’ and ‘Death Plaque’ to ‘A.G.C. Mousley R.F.A. with ‘Commonwealth War Graves’ printout. MISC 905 - MISC 905
The 1914 Star or 1914-15 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal respectively. These medals were primarily awarded to the Old Contemptible (B.E.F.). and by convention all three medals are worn together and in the same order from left to right when viewed from the front. The WWI Memorial Plaque was made from Bronze and hence it was popularly known as the “Dead Man’s Penny” among front-line troops, also becoming widely known as, the “Death Penny”, “Death Plaque” or “Widow's Penny”. It was in October 1916 that the British Government setup a committee for the idea of a commemorative plaque that could be given to the next of kin for those men and women whose deaths were due to the First World War of 1914-18. This ensemble is set onto and fixed to a piece of velvet covered hardboard, with the 1914 Star being engraved with ‘HMBR A.G.C Mousley A.F.A.’ The ‘Commonwealth War Graves’ printout gives personal and military details of ‘Arthur George Culver Mousley’. A great piece of history, worthy of further investigation. The price includes UK delivery. MISC 905. (Top of Drawers)
£325.00

1910 H.M.S. London ‘Sweetheart Brooch/Medallion’ Birmingham Silver Hallmark, in Fitted Case and Postcards. MISC 904. - MISC 904
A H.M.S. London ‘Sweetheart Brooch/Medallion’ with a Birmingham Silver Hallmark, in a fitted case and three postcards of H.M.S. London. During the course of the war, servicemen leaving home for the front line had to say goodbye to those they loved, and often left gifts and keepsakes for those they’d be missing. One popular gift was a small brooch depicting the service crest or regimental badge of the soldier in question. This gift was intended for soldiers to show that their home and their families would be in their hearts during their absence. The name ‘sweetheart’ can be misleading here, as it suggests that the item was only given to those in intimate relationships, but this isn’t the case. The sweetheart brooch was given to anyone the soldier would be leaving behind; therefore this could be their wife, parents, and even children. If it was given to a wife or a girlfriend, it was worn by that woman as a symbol of their pride and regard for their soldier. The ‘swivelling’ brooch is 4 ½ cm x 3 ¼ cm in silver with H.M.S. London to one side with a crest between two Dragons and the other is H.M.S. London with hallmarks *pin missing* the Birmingham hallmark dating it to 1910. It is encased in a fitted screw top case *1 ½ cm damage, see pictures* with a magnified window and a manufacturers sticker inside ‘The Welham Mfg Co. Medallists 6 & 8 Gt Chapel St London’. One postcard is 21 ½ cm x 16 ½ cm and is a black and white photograph of H.M.S. London with what appear to be New Year wishes to the front. The second is 14 cm x 8 ½ cm and a copy of an oil painting of H.M.S. London printed by ‘Raphael Tuck & Sons’ Art publishers to the King & Queen. The third is a B&W photograph of H.M.S. London, dated 30.12.1910 and is a New Year message to a sweetheart. A lovely bundle of memorabilia for the collector. The price includes UK delivery. MISC 904. (Medals)
£195.00

Commemorative Desk Model Sea Mine to Commodore C J Clarke, Commodore Minor War Vessels and Minewarfare, 16 Dec 1986 – 11 Oct 1988. - MISC 903
This is a commemorative desk top model of a sea mine presented to Commodore C J Clarke, Commodore Minor War Vessels and Minewarfare, 16 Dec 1986 – 11 Oct 1988 upon him leaving posting on the 11 Oct 1988. The Commodore of Minor War Vessels and Minewarfare is the navy’s responsibility for mines warfare by ship or divers and often involves disposing of old ordnance. Commodore C J Clarke was responsible whilst in his post for unveiling the memorial to the Men of the Royal And Allied Navies Minesweeping Service (HMS Lochinvar), Port Edgar which is at the Port Edgar Marina at South Queensferry in Edinburgh. The memorial was unveiled by Commodore C J Clarke on the 14th April 1988 to remember the men of the Royal Navy and Allies minesweeping and fisheries protection vessels since 1939. The mine is made out of solid brass with brass mine horns on it and is attached to a wooden plinth measuring 7” by 5”. The plaque is engraved ‘Commodore C J Clarke, Commodore Minor War Vessels and Minewarfare, 16 Dec 1986 – 11 Oct 1988’. The price for this attractive piece of memorabilia includes U.K. delivery. MISC 903
£375.00

**MASSIVE** Framed Original WW2 Japanese Soldier’s 'Yosegaki Hinomaru' (Or Good Luck) Battle Flag With Many Signatures. MISC 902 - MISC 902
This is a massive, original WW2 Japanese 'yosegaki hinomaru' or good luck Battle Flag. These flags were signed by family members, friends & Colleagues of Japanese Soldiers and presented to them before leaving for war. It is made of white silk and has a central vivid red painted roundel surrounded many Japanese script signatures. The flag has some staining consistent with age to be expected. The Flag is contained in its later varnished wood glazed frame. The rear of the frame is mounted with cord for wall hanging. This item including frame measures 34”x29 ½””x ½”. The small area of glare shown images are merely reflections from the camera flash. The price for this nicely presented unusually large WW2 Japanese flag which is framed ready for wall mounting includes UK delivery. MISC 902
£395.00
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