Items: 0 Price: £0    
view cart

Badges and Insignia

 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  Next Page 1 of 7

A Collection of 1961-1967 Brass ‘B&W’ Dragoons Shoulder Titles (Sold Separately). BA 393. - BA 393
The Berkshire & Westminster Dragoons (WDs) was a yeomanry regiment of the British Army Army Reserve, located in central London. Its lineage is continued by one of the Royal Yeomanry's six squadrons. Formed in the aftermath of Second Boer War as part of the County of London Yeomanry, the WDs fought in the Battle of Gallipoli and led British forces onto the beaches during the Normandy Invasion in 1944. The squadron most recently saw action on Operation Telic, for which it was mobilised for the 2003 war in Iraq. Seven items available with pins and backing plates *one with pin missing from the rear*. In good condition. The price includes UK delivery (the price is per title). BA 393. (Buckles badges drawer)
£25.00

*Original WWI Prussian ‘Garde Helmewappen’ (Helmet Front Plate). 19966:13. - 19966:13
This pattern of ‘Garde star’ is found on issued ‘Mannschaft Pickelhauben’. The appearance of the star is flat and the crown is solid. The star is stamped from German silver. With the curvature of the Eagle, the star measures 8mm in depth. This pattern of helmet plate was worn from 1895 to 1918. The Eagle is found in German silver of Brass, depending on regiment. In near perfect condition. The price for this helmet front plate includes UK delivery. 19966:13. (Front plate only)
£245.00

Victorian Officers ‘Northumberland’ Fusiliers Fur Cap Grenade Badge. 19289:17. - 19289:17
The Royal Northumberland Fusiliers were an infantry regiment of the British Army. Raised in 1674 as one of three 'English' units in the Dutch Anglo-Scots Brigade, it accompanied William III to England in the November 1688 Glorious Revolution and became part of the English establishment in 1689. In 1751, it became the 5th Regiment of Foot, with the regional title 'Northumberland' added in 1782; in 1836, it was designated a Fusilier unit and became the 5th (Northumberland Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot. After the 1881 Childers Reforms, it adopted the title Northumberland Fusiliers, then Royal Northumberland Fusiliers on 3 June 1935. In 1968, it was amalgamated with the Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment), the Royal Warwickshire Fusiliers and Lancashire Fusiliers to form the present Royal Regiment of Fusiliers. 10 cm in length and 4 ½ cm in width. Both lugs are present at the rear. Price includes UK postage. 19289:17.
£220.00

Victorian Royal Fusiliers Officers Fur Cap Grenade Badge. 19289:16. - 19289:16
The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) was a line infantry regiment of the British Army in continuous existence for 283 years. It was known as the 7th Regiment of Foot until the Childers Reforms of 1881. The regiment served in many wars and conflicts throughout its long existence, including the Second Boer War, the First World War and the Second World War. In 1968, the regiment was amalgamated with the other regiments of the Fusilier Brigade – the Royal Northumberland Fusiliers, the Royal Warwickshire Fusiliers and the Lancashire Fusiliers – to form a new large regiment, the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers. The Royal Fusiliers War Memorial, a monument dedicated to the almost 22,000 Royal Fusiliers who died during the First World War, stands on Holborn in the City of London. 10 ½ cm in length and 4 ½ cm wide. Silver Gilt and enamel with ‘honi soit qui mal y pense’ inscribed (shame on him who thinks evil of it). Both lugs are present to the rear. The price includes UK postage. 19289:16.
£280.00

Victorian ‘Royal Scots’ Fusiliers Officers Fur Cap Grenade Badge. 19289:15. - 19289:15
The Royal Scots Fusiliers was a line infantry regiment of the British Army that existed from 1678 until 1959 when it was amalgamated with the Highland Light Infantry (City of Glasgow Regiment) to form the Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment) which was later itself merged with the Royal Scots Borderers, the Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment), the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and the Highlanders (Seaforth, Gordons and Cameron’s) to form a new large regiment, the Royal Regiment of Scotland. 10cm in length and 4 ½ cm wide. Both lugs are present at the rear. The price includes UK postage. 19289:15.
£220.00

Victorian (c1860) Shako Plate for 27th (Bolton) Lancashire Rifle Volunteer ‘Arms of the Palatine on Lancaster’. 19289:14. - 19289:14
The Bolton Rifles, later the 5th Battalion, Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, was a volunteer unit of the British Army from 1859 until 1967. It served on the Western Front during the First World War, and in the Far East during the Second World War, when one battalion was captured at the Fall of Singapore. It consisted of four companies (at Bolton, Deane, Farnworth and Kearsley) commanded by Major William Gray, MP with a headquarters at a rented house in Crook Street. It had increased to six companies headquartered in Bridge Street by 1861, when Gray was promoted to lieutenant-colonel, and eight by 1863, headquartered at the old workhouse in Fletcher Street. The smaller 82nd Lancashire RVC (raised at Hindley on 14 June 1861) was attached to it. The Bolton Rifles' uniform was originally light grey with green facings and a grey cap, later changing to scarlet with green facings and regulation spiked helmet. Edward III raised Lancaster to a County Palatine for Henry’s lifetime. This meant that the new Duke had sovereign rights in the county in the spheres of justice and administration. The law courts in Lancashire were under the Duke’s administration and he appointed the sheriff, judges, justices of the peace and other senior officials. In medieval England Palatinate powers were devolved royal powers for use in regions where central government was difficult. The creation of Lancashire as a County Palatine may have been intended by Edward III as a protective barrier against the Scots. 12 ¼ cm in length and 9 cm wide. The 3 lugs are present to the rear. The price includes UK postage. 19289:14.
£275.00

Victorian ‘Royal Inniskilling’ Fusiliers Fur Cap Grenade Officers Badge. 19289:13. - 19289:13
The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers was an Irish line infantry regiment of the British Army in existence from 1881 until 1968. The regiment was formed in 1881 by the amalgamation of the 27th (Inniskilling) Regiment of Foot and the 108th Regiment of Foot. Arthur Cadwgan Michael illustration of a flare lighting up an Ottoman attack on Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers' positions near Achi Baba, Gallipoli, It saw service in the Second Boer War, the First World War and the Second World War. In 1968 it was amalgamated with the other regiments in the North Irish Brigade, the Royal Ulster Rifles, and the Royal Irish Fusiliers (Princess Victoria's) into the Royal Irish Rangers. 10 ½ cm in length and 4 ¾ cm wide. Both lugs are present to the rear. Postage and packing is included in the price. 19289:13.
£295.00

Victorian Officers Silver Gilt ‘Manchester Regiment’ Helmet Plate (Maker Hobson & Sons). 19289:12. - 19289:12
The Manchester Regiment was formed on the 1st July 1881 when the 63rd and 96th Regiments of Foot were amalgamated under the Childers Reform. However the Regiment can trace its history back a further 123 years prior to this date. Hobsons began their uniform business close to Woolwich Barracks, South London, England. Clothing and Regimental Regalia were made for all members of the armed forces using traditional tailoring and handcraft techniques. Hobsons business grew to such an extent that by 1860 five shops were open in and around the Woolwich area. Their expertise and reputation for quality was rapidly established among customers, particularly the locally based Royal Artillery. Lexington Street London W.1 was acquired for Hobsons around 1880. Gold and Silver wire embroidery was produced here along with the weaving of lace. In the basement, the Leather Accoutrements department produced specialist goods of all descriptions. By the turn of the century the new Hobsons factory and offices in Tooley St (between London Bridge and Tower Bridge ) were in operation. Several hundred employees worked at making all garments and accessories required for the Guards uniforms. In the 1930's Hobsons purchased a disused church hall with a plot of surrounding land at Thundersley, Essex with the long term plan of drawing all parts of the business together into one place - this would take another 60 years. 12 cm in length and 11 ¾ cm wide. All 3 lugs are present and the maker ‘Hobson & Sons’ plate to the rear. The price includes UK postage and packaging. 19289:12.
£425.00

Victorian Officers Volunteer Artillery Busby Plume Holder. 19289:11. - 19289:11
On 12 May 1859, the Secretary of State for War, Jonathan Peel issued a circular letter to lieutenants of counties in England, Wales and Scotland, authorising the formation of volunteer rifle corps (VRC, a.k.a. corps of rifle volunteers and rifle volunteer corps), and of artillery corps in defended coastal towns. Volunteer corps were to be raised under the provisions of the Volunteer Act 1804, which had been used to form local defence forces during the Napoleonic Wars. Alfred Tennyson captured the spirit of the time by publishing his poem Riflemen Form in The Times on 9 May 1859. As a basis for the units, many communities had rifle clubs for the enjoyment of the sport of shooting. 9 ½ cm in length and 4 ½ cm wide, complete with slider. The price includes UK postage. 19289:11.
£175.00

Post ‘1901’ Kings Crown Officers Silver Gilt ‘Manchester Regiment’ Helmet Plate. 19289:10 - 19289:10
The Manchester Regiment was formed on the 1st July 1881 when the 63rd and 96th Regiments of Foot were amalgamated under the Childers Reform. However the Regiment can trace its history back a further 123 years prior to this date. 12 ½ cm in length and 11 cm wide. All 3 lugs are present to the rear. The price includes UK postage and packaging. 19289:10.
£395.00
 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  Next Page 1 of 7