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English Georgian ‘Elephant & Castle’ (London) Ebonised Wood Baluster Tipstaff / Truncheon With Hand Painted Decoration Crown GR Royal Cypher & Elephant and Castle (Howdah) Devices. Sn 20572 - 20572
The earliest record of the Tipstaff (Warrant Stick) was in the 14th century. The name derives from the early origins of Policing when Warranted Officers would apprehend a criminal with the help if necessary of a tipped staff. The staff would be made of wood or metal and were not only a means of self defence but the tips of the staffs would bear symbols of their authority. Modern Police Truncheons originated from these Tipstaffs. Elephant and Castle is an area of south London, England, in the London Borough of Southwark. The name also informally refers to much of Walworth and Newington. The name of the area is derived from a local coaching inn. "Elephant and Castle, Newington" first recorded in 1765. The landlord may have been aligning the tavern with the Worshipful Company of Cutlers; the guild responsible for regulating the manufacture of weapons and cutlery who, for many years, incorporated ivory into the handles of their wares- hence their coat of arms bearing the Elephant and Castle (howdah) icon. This is an excellent original Georgian Police Tip Staff / Truncheon of the Police constabulary/ watchman or magistrate of the Elephant & castle area with original hand painted decoration. The Baluster shape shaft is made of ebonised wood, tapered and shaped for grip. The staff measures 15” length. The painted decoration in the top section features a Crown and Royal Cypher ‘GR’ (George rex) together with colourful & Elephant and Castle (Howdah) Device and wreath. The staff has ribbed grip and holed for wrist strap. All of the staff’s colourful decoration is vivid. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 20572
£375.00

British Made Hiatt Leading Handcuff. POL 378. - POL 378
An original, quality, plated wrought iron leading handcuff, British made. The leading handcuff was still in use as late as the 1970's in Britain and first came into use in the mid to late 19th Century. It was designed to 'snap' onto the wrist and locked in place, the officer could control the offender by carefully twisting the other end which gave full control. They lock with a snap lock kept closed with a spring clip. This leading handcuff is in very good condition, the spring clip works as it should, they lock together. They have a single hinge point which moves smoothly. The body is stamped near to the clip with "Hiatt Steel" on one side and "British made" on the other. There are a couple of small pieces of plating missing from normal usage. The price includes UK delivery. POL 378.
£175.00

Large British George III Baluster Tipstaff / Truncheon With Turned Hand Painted Crown Top & Crown GR III Royal Cypher. Sn 20532 - 20532
The earliest record of the Tipstaff (Warrant Stick) was in the 14th century. The name derives from the early origins of Policing when Warranted Officers would apprehend a criminal with the help if necessary of a tipped staff. The staff would be made of wood or metal and were not only a means of self defence but the tips of the staffs would bear symbols of their authority. Modern Police Truncheons originated from these Tipstaffs. This is an excellent original Georgian Police Tip Staff / Truncheon with original hand painted decoration. The Baluster shape wood shaft is tapered and shaped for grip. The staff measures 18 ¾” length. The top is turned and hand decorated in the form of a crown above painted Royal Cypher ‘GR III’ (George II Rex) on a field of green. The staff has a stepped butt with ball end. The shaft is holed for wrist cord. All of the staff’s colourful decoration is vivid. The price for this large Georgian tipstaff includes UK delivery. Sn 20532
£595.00

1808 Dated British George III Mahogany Baluster Tipstaff / Truncheon With Hand Painted Decoration Crown GR III Royal Cypher, ‘*12.D’ Between Shield Device ‘T.M’. Sn 20531 - 20531
The earliest record of the Tipstaff (Warrant Stick) was in the 14th century. The name derives from the early origins of Policing when Warranted Officers would apprehend a criminal with the help if necessary of a tipped staff. The staff would be made of wood or metal and were not only a means of self defence but the tips of the staffs would bear symbols of their authority. Modern Police Truncheons originated from these Tipstaffs. This is an excellent original Georgian Police Tip Staff / Truncheon with original hand painted decoration. The Baluster shape shaft is made of Mahogany, tapered and shaped for grip. The staff measures 13 ¾” length. The painted decoration in the top section features a Crown and Royal Cypher ‘GR III’ (George II Rex), together with ‘*12.D’ Between Shield Device ‘T.M’ on a field of green (most likely a Police Constabulary Division or County designation) and ‘1808’ date. The staff has a stepped top and butt. The butt of the handle has a small old stable chip on the edge which can be seen in the images, consistent with age and service use. All of the staff’s colourful decoration is vivid. The price for this tipstaff worthy of further research regarding the markings includes UK delivery. Sn 20531
£475.00

Victorian British Lignum Vitae Tropical Hard Wood Baluster Tipstaff / Truncheon With Hand Painted Decoration Crown V.R. (Victoria Regina)Royal Cypher, ‘1’ & ‘A*L Above D’. Sn 20530 - 20530
The earliest record of the Tipstaff (Warrant Stick) was in the 14th century. The name derives from the early origins of Policing when Warranted Officers would apprehend a criminal with the help if necessary of a tipped staff. The staff would be made of wood or metal and were not only a means of self defence but the tips of the staffs would bear symbols of their authority. Modern Police Truncheons originated from these Tipstaffs. This is an excellent original Victorian Police Tip Staff / Truncheon with original hand painted decoration. The Baluster shape shaft is made of heavy Lignum Vitae Tropical Hard Wood, tapered and shaped for grip. The staff measures 14 ½” length. The painted decoration in the top section features a Crown and Royal Cypher ‘V.R’ (Victoria Regina), together with number 1 within laurel wreath to the front on a field of black edged in red and ‘A*L Above D’ (most likely a Police Constabulary Division or County designation) to the rear. The top edge of the staff has one small chip which can be seen in the images, consistent with age and service use. All of the staff’s colourful decoration is vivid. The price for this tipstaff worthy of further research regarding the markings includes UK delivery. Sn 20530
£345.00

1830 Dated British William IV Ash Tipstaff Truncheon With Hand Painted Decoration Including ‘WIVR’ (William IV Rex) & DMW. Sn 20529 - 20529
The earliest record of the Tipstaff (Warrant Stick) was in the 14th Century. The name derives from the early origins of Policing when Warranted Officers would apprehend a criminal with the help if necessary of a tipped staff. The staff would be made of wood or metal and were not only a means of self defence but also symbols of their authority. Modern Police Truncheons originated from these Tipstaffs. William IV was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and King of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death in 1837. This is an excellent original William IV Tipstaff Truncheon. The body is made of hand painted ash wood. The staff measures 18 ¾” length. It has colourful original hand painted decoration featuring a Crown and Royal Cypher ‘WIVR’ (William IV Rex) Chevrons and roundels within panel & 1830 date below D.M.W. (most likely a Police Constabulary or County area (unknown). All of the staff’s colours are vivid. The grip is holed for wrist strap. The price for this attractive tipstaff worthy of further research regarding the ‘DMW’ mark includes UK delivery. Sn 20529
£745.00

Victorian British Halifax County Borough Police Constabulary Uniform Leather Waist Belt, Buckle & 2 Piece Brass Clasp. Sn 20422 - 20422
The Halifax County Borough Police Constabulary was formed in 1848 and amalgamated in 1868. This is an original Victorian period Halifax County Borough Police uniform leather waist belt and 2 piece brass Constabulary clasp. The waist belt is black leather with brass adjustment slide and leather loop. The leather has areas of surface wear consistent to age & Police service wear. The belt is complete and wearable. It is 46" long when laid out flat and is 2” wide. The back of the belt has an impressed number which appears to be ‘120’ most likely the collar number of the Police Constable or Sgt issued with the belt. When locked together the 2 piece brass clasp forms the badge of the Halifax County Borough Police Constabulary. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 20422
£195.00

Kings Crown Police Presentation, Hand Decorated Truncheon to Dubartonshire Constabulary. Sn 10727. - Sn 10727
A Kings Crown police presentation, hand decorated truncheon to Dunbartonshire Constabulary. The Police (Scotland) Act 1857 established police forces throughout Scotland. A section of the act allowed for the parishes to be transferred to the jurisdiction of either Stirlingshire or Lanarkshire Constabulary on resolution of two thirds of the Commissioners of Supply for the County of Dumbarton. Dunbartonshire Constabulary was formed in 1958. The truncheon is made from a hard wood and varnished. It is hand decorated straight onto the varnish. The top has the Kings Crown in gold, red and white and below this is a twin headed thistle. Below this is "Dunbartonshire Constabulary" in gold lettering. The truncheon has a broad fine grooved grip. It is complete with a leather strap which is spliced and stitched. It is very good condition, the decoration is clear. The truncheon measures 16" long. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 10727.
£325.00

Excellent Original British Police 1920's Wootton Lantern By Smiths of Cricklewood. Sn 13907:39. - 13907:39
An excellent condition British Police 1920's Wootton Lantern by Smiths of Cricklewwod. Batteries have been around since 1800 but these were bulky and used a liquid acid as an electrolyte and therefore were impractical for use in any hand-held light. What was to be called the dry cell battery came into being around 1880 but was still too bulky to be considered for use in a convenient personal-use light. In 1887, a true dry cell battery was invented. The dry cell did not require a liquid acid as electrolyte and therefore was “dry”, and so the name. The lamp itself was designed by George Arthur Henry Wootton who was the Assistant (Chief) Engineer of the Metropolitan Police in the 1920s. The patent carries the date of 23rd November, 1922. This lamp was powered by an accumulator of 2 volts and the lens was able to be focused by turning the metal ring around the lens. The lamps were used mainly by police. The manufacturer of these lamps, Smith’s and Son was situated in Cricklewood. The lamp is in very good undamaged condition. The top is released by pushing a button on the side, see one of the photographs. On the top is a rotating on off switch which operates smoothly. There is a compartment in the front under the lens which holds a spare bulb, which is present. The light can be focused by twisting the lens cover on the front, this rotates as it should and the lenses moves forward and back to focus as it should. The bulb in the lamp is also present. There is a manufacturer's plate on the front with "Patent No 201089/22 (1922) Smiths British manfcr The Wootton Lantern". There is also a small push button to the side of the lenses. On the reverse it has two fold out brass handles which open and close smoothly. The bottom has "The Wootton Lantern Patent No 201089 Ser no 62923 sole manufactures S Smith & Sons (Ma) Ltd Cricklewood London". The lantern retains about 80% of the original black paint. It is undamaged. The price includes UK delivery. 13907:39.
£275.00

Kings Crown Police Presentation, Hand Decorated Truncheon to Dunfermline City Police. Sn 10728. - Sn 10728
A Kings Crown police presentation, hand decorated truncheon to Dunfermline City Police. George V was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions, and Emperor of India, from 6 May 1910 until his death in 1936. In 1856 the burgh of Dunfermline resolved to use the title of "city" in all official documents in the future, based on long usage and its former status as a royal capital. This then made the Dunfermline police the Dunfermline City Police. In the late 1990s, the UK government and the Scottish Executive re-examined the definition of a city and produced a list of "approved cities", from which several traditional Scottish cities, including Dunfermline. were omitted. The truncheon is made from a hard wood and varnished. It is hand decorated straight onto the varnish. The top has the Kings Crown in gold, red, green and white and below this "GR" (King George) in gold. Below this is the Dunfermline Crest in gold and red with "Dunfermline City Police in Gold lettering. The truncheon has a broad five groove grip. It is very good condition, the decoration is clear. The truncheon measures 15" long. The price includes UK delivery. Sn 10728.
£250.00
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